As a Nashvillian with one foot in Hollywood, and the other at home in Music City, Johnathon Schaech is looking to make an impact on and off the big screen. Though landing a role in the newly released film, The Night Clerk, has surely landed him some press, he really hopes to incite change through his tenacious involvement with the ever-important #MeToo movement. We sat down with him to pick his brain; read below for our exclusive interview.

 

TNE: What is your favorite part about living in Nashville?

JS: Family. My wife, Julie Solomon, has the most fabulous family here. My son’s grandparents are favorite things; everyone should have a KK and a Big T.

 

TNE: What are your go-to Nashville spots?

JS: I eat way too much chicken salad from Zoe’s, The Chicken Salad Chick, and Barbara’s. I also spend way too much time at Home Depot.

 

TNE: What advice do you live by?

JS: Speak courage to comfort.

 

TNE: What does 2020 hold for you? Is there anything planned you are most looking forward to?

JS: Julie, Camden, and I will be welcoming a baby this July.

 

TNE: What do you consider your greatest achievement?

JS: My family.

 

TNE: What is the most important lesson life has taught you?

JS: I don’t know yet- I’m still learning.

 

TNE: Where would you most like to be right now?

JS: Anywhere where Julie and Camden are.

 

TNE: One bucket list item you are checking off this year?

JS: Being on Ellen.

 

TNE: What apps do you use the most?

JS: Grammarly…oh, and Twitter. I’m obsessed with Twitter @JohnSchaech.

 

TNE: What is your favorite travel destination?

JS: Hawaii, and that Blackberry Farm place everyone keeps talking about.

 

TNE: Who is the funniest person, you know?

JS: Tom Hanks.

 

TNE: Can you tell us one thing most people don’t know about you?

JS: I used to hold the hand of my good friend Ellen DeGeneres and pretend we were together. The world was not ready for a gay woman to have a successful TV show.

 

TNE: What is the most recent thing you regret not buying?

JS: My wife, Julie Solomon ‘s online courses. Empower Inc.

 

TNE: What is your favorite recent purchase?

JS: Guitar lessons for Camden and I.

 

TNE: What in your wardrobe do you wear most often?

JS: Black NoBull high-tops.

 

TNE: What is on your playlist right now?

JS: Joan Jett, Queen, and Rascal Flatts since this is their farewell tour.

 

TNE: If you could learn a new skill, what would it be?

JS: Ju-Jitsu.

 

TNE: What are you most grateful for?

JS: Julie’s love for me.

 

 

TNE: What keeps you awake at night?

JS: My diabetic dog Foxy.

 

TNE: First thing you do in the morning?

JS: Gratitude’s.

 

TNE: Travel essentials…what is always in your luggage?

JS: My diabetic dog Foxy.

 

TNE: What is your last box set or Netflix binge?

JS: The Healing Powers of Dude.

 

TNE: What is your most treasured possession?

JS: My parents gave me a paperweight of the serenity prayer when I moved to Hollywood.

 

TNE: For your latest project, The Night Clerk, discuss your role in the film and what drew you into the project?  

JS: The film is about an autistic person who puts cameras in the rooms of a hotel where he works as the night clerk. He uses these cameras to try and understand human interactions. (Something that is a challenge with his brain difference.) He ends up capturing a murder. I play the victim’s husband and a crucial part in this murder mystery. Most of my work in the movie is with the Golden Globe-nominated Ana De Armas (Knives Out), and that drew me to the project. However, the fantastic script that Pulitzer Prize-winner Michael Cristofer wrote was the biggest draw. Also, the subject matter is near and dear to my heart. I’ve spent about fifteen years working with Talk About Curing Autism (TACA).

 

TNE: You have been a brave proponent of the #MeToo movement, speaking out and sharing your personal story. Can you share one piece of advice/wisdom for anyone struggling with the same truth and going through what you went through?

JS: When you’re able to understand that it is not your fault and that you are not alone, you get to own the truth of your story, and you get to write a new ending.

 

TNE: In regards to the #MeToo movement, you have mentioned the shared empowering experience, what has the support meant to you? 

JS: #MeToo means a lot of different things to different people, but to me, it is about the truth. This truth grants individuals the freedom to finally be the exact person that God meant them to be.

 

TNE: #MeToo has given people a platform to speak out against abuse and harassment and encourages survivors and victims’ to share their stories. Besides the obvious societal and environmental changes this movement is working to change, what other things do you hope this movement accomplishes?

JS: I do not think the changes are apparent or obvious to most people. I think #MeToo means a lot of different things to different people. I think it was hijacked for important political agendas and I think it was hijacked by a lot of individuals for selfish goals. I hope and pray #MeToo gives all God’s children the ability to say, “my body, my rules.” I hope it gives women the ability and equality to thrive without fear of being sexually harassed or abused. I hope it encourages men.

 

TNE: What are you up to next?

JS: I have an amazing film called Quiet in My Town directed by Michael Carney (Same Kind of Different as Me) coming out next. I am also producing a documentary for Mark Wahlberg about a 1963 bank-robbing little league coach.

 

To keep up with Johnathon, follow him on Twitter and Instagram @JohnSchaech.